PUSHBACK talks

6AM Bulldozer – Live and Direct from Nigeria with Chicoco Radio

November 27, 2020 Season 1 Episode 22
PUSHBACK talks
6AM Bulldozer – Live and Direct from Nigeria with Chicoco Radio
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PUSHBACK talks
6AM Bulldozer – Live and Direct from Nigeria with Chicoco Radio
Nov 27, 2020 Season 1 Episode 22

The Filmmaker and the Advocate are joined by extra special guests from Port Harcourt Nigeria – Chicoco Radio, made up of rappers and mappers, musicians, journalists, filmmakers and photographers. Together they discuss the harsh inequalities experienced in Africa's largest nation, particularly in the oil-producing Delta Coast – where erasure of communities and extremely violent forced evictions are a common part of life. The Chicoco guests draw parallels between their experiences of police brutality at the hands of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) and recent protests and the Black Lives Matter movement. What makes Chicoco utterly special - as well as this episode of PUSHBACK Talks -  is their use of song in their resistance. They say -- in Chicoco we’ve all experienced forced evictions either first-hand or through someone we love. We’re singing for change … to push back the fear of demolitions, of bullets and of wounds. Here we go.  Turn this one up LOUD.

More from  Chicoco Radio at https://chicoco.fm/

Guests:
Grace Timi 
Tammy Uzodinma
IB Johnson
Michael Uwemedimo

Musicians:
Miebaka Kienabere - lead vox
Faithia Blaze - vox
Imanny Cleverstone - rap
Slim D - rap
Young Crown - rap
Denny Tunez - guitar
Bright Benjamin - cajon

Chicoco Radio Team:

Tech:
Osom Product
Promise Sunday
Ana Bonaldo

Camera:
Imanny Cleverstone
Tammy Fingaz

IT:
Kelex Maduewesi  

Produced by WG Film 
Recorded & Edited by Mikey Jones
Music by Florencia Di Concilio
Social Media & Support Team - Louise Gustafsson & Maja Moberg  

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/pushbacktalks)

Show Notes Transcript

The Filmmaker and the Advocate are joined by extra special guests from Port Harcourt Nigeria – Chicoco Radio, made up of rappers and mappers, musicians, journalists, filmmakers and photographers. Together they discuss the harsh inequalities experienced in Africa's largest nation, particularly in the oil-producing Delta Coast – where erasure of communities and extremely violent forced evictions are a common part of life. The Chicoco guests draw parallels between their experiences of police brutality at the hands of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) and recent protests and the Black Lives Matter movement. What makes Chicoco utterly special - as well as this episode of PUSHBACK Talks -  is their use of song in their resistance. They say -- in Chicoco we’ve all experienced forced evictions either first-hand or through someone we love. We’re singing for change … to push back the fear of demolitions, of bullets and of wounds. Here we go.  Turn this one up LOUD.

More from  Chicoco Radio at https://chicoco.fm/

Guests:
Grace Timi 
Tammy Uzodinma
IB Johnson
Michael Uwemedimo

Musicians:
Miebaka Kienabere - lead vox
Faithia Blaze - vox
Imanny Cleverstone - rap
Slim D - rap
Young Crown - rap
Denny Tunez - guitar
Bright Benjamin - cajon

Chicoco Radio Team:

Tech:
Osom Product
Promise Sunday
Ana Bonaldo

Camera:
Imanny Cleverstone
Tammy Fingaz

IT:
Kelex Maduewesi  

Produced by WG Film 
Recorded & Edited by Mikey Jones
Music by Florencia Di Concilio
Social Media & Support Team - Louise Gustafsson & Maja Moberg  

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/pushbacktalks)

Fredrik Gertten (00:00):

For a long time now it's like 21st episode or is it something? Yeah,

Leilani Farha  (00:04):

I think it's the, maybe the 22nd.

Fredrik Gertten (00:07):

Is it okay? Yeah. So it's, I mean, and this is what we do these days, and then we Zoom around the world. So I'm going to, I'm going to talk to audiences in Wales tonight who are been watching push. And this happens almost every week. We have something upcoming in Antwerp, and we're going to talk to people who discuss these issues. And I guess you Zoom around a lot, also talking to audiences after the film. And so on

Leilani Farha  (00:35):

I have been zooming around in particular in the United States because we've had the release of push throughout the U S so I was in Miami. I've been in Pittsburgh. And very recently I was in of all places, college park, Maryland at the university of Maryland. Yeah. With a group of amazing students, really suffering some of them, some, you know, student housing problems. But there was a surprise when I was at the university of Maryland, the host Michael Bodaken, it turns out is our first was our first is our first Patron.

Fredrik Gertten (01:19):

Wow Michael, thank you. And I actually saw that he was raising his, uh, pledged to like $50 a month. That's like amazing. So

Leilani Farha  (01:30):

Thank you, Michael.

Fredrik Gertten (01:31):

Thank You, Michael. And we're actually, now we have 19 patrons in, and that it's a total of a $128 a month. It's I mean, it's, it's more than a cup of coffee, so it's, it's good.

Leilani Farha  (01:45):

Sure. But you know what? Maybe we could increase to 22, like one new Patriot per episode,

Fredrik Gertten (01:52):

But we also got the donation from Bill Barberg, which is kind of cool. Thank you very much, bill. We should talk soon. Yes. Anyway, Leilani, you've been, I mean, you recently in may, just before. Yeah. In the early days of the, of the pandemic use, you stepped out, you left your UN hat behind and you moved on to being the global director of the shift. But I, we traveled a lot shooting Push and also afterwards we've been talking a lot and you always talked about your strong experience from your official mission to Nigeria. What was it that struck you So, so, so deeply with Nigeria,

Leilani Farha  (02:33):

It was, it was, it was my second last mission, I think. And it was amazing. First of all, every rapporteur wants to go to Nigeria. Why it is the largest black nation in the world with 200 million people. I mean, it's huge, but it's also such a complex place full of gross inequality, like really inequality. I think and I, you know, I w my statistics may be a little wrong because it's been some while, but like 70% of the population lives below the poverty line. Um, like 60 million people don't have access to safe water, a huge percentage, I think 50% of the population is living in what people call slums or informal settlements. So that's really bad.

Fredrik Gertten (03:29):

And then we're talking about the Africa's or the world's 29th economy. So it's, it's, it's a rich country,

Leilani Farha  (03:36):

A rich country. And I remember reading that the number of millionaires, uh, between 2004 and 2010, something like this had increased by 44%. So you have half the population living in squalor, and then this huge, you know, huge increase in wealth for some,

Fredrik Gertten (03:59):

Hmm. It looks like the pattern of, of the world basically, but, but in Nigeria, in a very, in a very extremely graphic, uh, way, yeah.

Leilani Farha  (04:08):

An oil producing country, 29th, largest GDP in the world, and right beside Austria, you know, so,

Fredrik Gertten (04:17):

But I remember you, you talked about one of your, your, your strongest impressions from Nigeria when you went down to the oil Delta down to Port Harcourt, and, and then that this radio station was something that you really loved. So I can actually hear some music now can't you hear some music coming out

Leilani Farha  (04:39):

Or something.

Chicoco Radio  (04:48):

We're the Chicoco collective, we're a bunch of rappers, mappers, musicians, journalists, filmmakers, and photographers can see Chris is I see. So here in Chicoco, we've all experienced forced eviction, either firsthand or through someone we know and love. We're singing for change. We sing this song to push back the fear of demolition of bulldozers, of bullets, and of wounds, because I come from the ghetto government them come for gettho. Are we human beings? Are we human beings? Because I'd say I come from the ghetto city government come for the gettho. Are we human beings? Are we human beings? 6AM as I wake up, bulldozer. 6AM as I wakeup bulldozer. 6AM as I wake up, bulldozer, trough my door. 6AM as I wake up, bulldozer.

Fredrik Gertten (10:39):

Thank you. This is actually recorded live for us here at push-back talks straight from port Harcourt, Nigeria. I sometimes Zooming out is not that bad. It's actually quite cool to zoom around the world and, and, you know, and, and they're singing about, you know, being woken up at 6:00 AM in the morning, and then the bulldozers are outside. And this is the story you've heard. We've heard from all over the world from Latin America, from Southeast Asia, from, you know, around Africa, but also now from parts around Europe and North America. I mean, the, the, the violence and the brutalization of our society is like, it's, it's getting really close. So it's an important song coming to us here, but I, but I'm so happy for the, for the energy.

Leilani Farha  (11:28):

That's amazing. It's amazing. And it's, it's such a, I mean, I'm singing along and dancing along, and then I'm realizing, we're talking about one of the worst violations of human rights. You know, we're singing about one of the worst violations of human rights. That is so, I mean, I've met so many families, who've been in households, who've been evicted and it's absolutely devastating. I mean, it's just, it destroys life and community and spirit, you know, and that's probably the intention,

Fredrik Gertten (12:00):

But I also see that this energy coming out and the lightness of the music is also really important for us to be able to survive and to be able to push back happy for thanks for including pushback in your song. That was really cool because we need to push back. So we are now with radio Chicaco in port Harcourt, Nigeria, and you should check out the, the, the chicoco.fm website. It's extremely cool. There's a lot of stories out there, uh, filmed and music and stuff. So it's you really dive straight into the city of port Harcourt, Nigeria, Michael, Uwemedimo. You are you're, you're the guy we've been talking to from afar. So can you just set us? Where are we now?

Chicoco Radio  (12:48):

So we are in a city in the creeks, the oil capital of Nigeria, a city that was founded for the sole purpose of the extraction of resources. It was the railway Terminus for coal coming inland from Enugu and the deep water port to take that coal around the then colonial coast. And then some years later, three years before independence, commercial quantities of oil was struck in 1956. So we're here in the, the heart of, of dark cargo.

Fredrik Gertten (13:30):

I've been trying to read up a little bit like a sort of your part hockers 1 million inhabitants, or at least officially. And then you have it's 50 K up from the coast by the river. And your, your radio staiton is situated by the river in, uh, like in the Harbor slum. What I understand, can you describe this, the streets where you arrive, where you are?

Speaker 5 (13:52):

So port Harcourt, the old city was built on a plateau and all around the old city is a tangle of creeks, very dense tangle of creeks. And along the water's edge, people have taken mud called chicocomud, black mud from the mangroves and thrown it down to reclaim land from the water. And up to half a million people live in these dense, waterfront settlements, all around the city. They're overlooked, unheard, literally overlooked because for many parts of the city, you can't even see them. And for the most part, they're ignored by the government. And then when they become of interest, usually because of private public partnerships, we launch into some very intense demolition campain. So where we're here in the heart of the waterfronts live and direct. Okay.

Fredrik Gertten (14:57):

And Michael, just to make this short, your, your Nigerian accent is like very special. Can you give us a short update about,

Chicoco Radio  (15:05):

Yeah, my, my Nigerian accent came from my mum. Who's, British. Um, my, my non Nigerian accent came from my dad. Who's Nigerian.

Fredrik Gertten (15:15):

So nice. Nice to be with you. And you, and you have also brought some other friends to the, to the mics. Uh, I can see three and I only know that we have IB and Tammy, but there is like a third person to grace, grace and grace. So nice to have you on, on our talk. So Leilani, what is your you've been there?

Leilani Farha  (15:37):

I've been there. And the, the greeting I received in Chicoco was unbelievable. It was a complete highlight of my trip to Nigeria. So I forget where I'd been before, but it was like hot and a big community meeting. And I was running like super late and I arrived in Chicoco to music and dance, just like we've had this morning Fredrik or on the podcast today. It was incredible. And then we, we, I heard about this radio station and I said, Hey, we should do like a radio show together. And so Grace, I don't know, but grace took me to the radio station and she did this phenomenal interview. We had such fun, even though I was running super late, but we just did it anyway. And, uh, it was amazing. And then I got to see chicoco and the vibrant, vibrant, informal settlement. You know, our listeners may not know what informal settlements are like, but they, they can be the height of energy and passion and, um, orderliness. They're like little cities themselves.

Fredrik Gertten (16:45):

Uh, so you had a UN special repertoire coming to you. Have you, and you interviewed her, how have you been able to use the language of Leilani in your city? Because her message is quite clear. Housing is a humanright?

Chicoco Radio  (17:01):

Yes. Locally. Yes. We've done something with how work and we're also working towards something we'll put up on a platform on the Chicoco websites using her work and then do a follow up as well.

Fredrik Gertten (17:14):

So, and you were singing in the song here about the forced eviction. Is this something that you've experienced yourself? You friends, Tammy IB.

Chicoco Radio  (17:23):

Yes. Um, growing up as a young child, um, I, I grew up, I was given birth to, in the railway quarters, so it's uptown and, um, we're living happily until they came to forcefully evict us I remember dressed for school. And then before us were three young men who came in and were asking us to leave and we're hopeless at that point, but my mom fought hard, to ensure that we were not evicted as that that's the, but then we had to hurriedly look for somewhere. And where else can we go to instead for the slum? And so we had to move to the slum, the slum accommodated us, and we became comfortable. So to say, in this slum, and we decided now, that's why for someone like me, I've decided that being part of this slum or make our voice head, it's not different from what's happens of the only, the only difference in here is that, um, we make life ourselves because we hardly see government presence.

Chicoco Radio  (18:20):

I remember I was small. My dad was a lecturer. So we stayed in a government building. So after he, he taught for years and when he died, few months later, they came and told us, they said, you have to leave because the, the, the person who worked with us as a government officer is no longer alive, and you're not our staff. So you have to pack up the house that happened. And my mom had to, she said she had small savings accounts. So she was looking for a place to pay for her children to enter please. [Inaudible], whether you like to buy, at least that's money used to pay for house rents. used it to buy a land and also Butte. So she came, it was water lock. But she had to buy, use the Chicoco black mud to, clean her space. And she built the house that was housed with us living there. Who'd been there for now 29 years. Then some years back, we were in the house and they told us government officials are coming bulldozers they want to come and demolish. My mom shouted, again? Where am I going to go? So she followed the women and the boys to test for them not to come close to, uh, our house front. And that was how we found later found Michael and came up with Chicoco.

Chicoco Radio  (19:38):

The Bundu she's talking about is another waterfront. And people were protesting the planned demolition of the community. And a week earlier, some enumerators had come into the community to mark the houses with red paint, big cross, the opposite of the Passover, right. And they had driven the enumerators out. And so they came back in a show of force, the JTF, the joint task force, the mobile police, and they opened fire. Wow. On the protesters, at least one person is killed. We, we think more, but we, we only use the numbers that we have a confirmation of, at least one person was killed and 11 seriously injured. When was this? This was 12th of October, 2009. And that was the beginning of this project in many ways, because it was just naked. It was stark that people could have the homes bulldozed and be, be shot for protesting it. So we decided to take the government to court, to allow people to represent themselves legally, and then started exploring different forms of representation. And that led to the radio, to the cinema, to music.

Chicoco Radio  (21:10):

Okay. My name is Ivy Johnson. For my case, it was a try of demolition, not an actual, the demolition or eviction. I was born in a waterfront known as a Napa waterfront. We later moved to another waterfront because that was what my parents could afford at the time. [inaudible] 2009. I was an undergraduate student at the university of Port Hartcourt when we got a rumor Oh God. Rumor of demolition of all the waterfronts in revureses by the then governor of the state, right on [inaudible] me wrote to me, I made sure she became, so the fear was there. My dad was not in town. We're all alone. And our house was about to be demolished and all that. So there was this protest. We came down from school, my friends and I, but it was unfortunate because I can't forget that day. My, my, my colleague, my friend was arrested that day. And a graduate student of computer science of investor universoty of Port Hartcourt was arrested that day. We had no trial, who was sent straight to the prison, just like that, no trial, nothing though. He was able to get out, but the memory sticks to my head that we have little or nothing to fight this government when it comes to that. So that built of something in me that I want to have to, something that I can fight back, I can push back when the time comes for these things.

Chicoco Radio  (22:41):

I think maybe it's just worth clarifying, you know, for people who might be listening in London or Montreal or New York, when we talk about forced evictions here, demolitions, we're talking about soldiers. Bulldozes turning up unannounced early in the morning, late at night in the pouring torrential rain and bulldozing houses. As people are running to leave them with total impunity, the, the intensity of the violence is, is overwhelming. It's perhaps difficult for people who haven't witnessed it to imagine. People often think about forced evictions and housing rights as some technical issue to do with urban planning. The house is the first shelter of the imagination. It's where you live and where you dream. And to have the homes of 17,000 people destroyed in a single weekend with no recourse, no alternative provision made. And for that to be unremarkable is a situation that we're in here. And our plan was just to make that remarkable to, to market, to, to speak it, to show it.

Fredrik Gertten (24:23):

It's so brutal. And we also know that sometimes, uh, the developers use a natural disaster. Like if a storm like the, that what happened in Puerto Rico, for example, they use that as a way to kick people out it's cynical and, and brutal. I mean, not normally we don't get any news out of Nigeria, but suddenly there was a lot of news coming out of Nigeria because you're, you're, the police, especially in a special unit of the police also has been, it's really criticized. And the people are standing up in a way that we haven't seen from a far, uh, in, in Nigeria right now. So it's, it seems like the situation is quite politicized. Can you give us an update on, on and disarm the campaign you have ongoing in, in Nigeria, right?

Chicoco Radio  (25:08):

The sass issue or the police issue has been with us. And like Leilani said, when she started, she said that she imagined that we turned what should have turned out to be , sorrowful into something meaningful. we had to make ourselves happy. Sometimes even when we just see to discuss these issues, we just sit and laugh, but that it has been something with us, like dayly, you go out on the road and a police officer stops you. And they say, Hey, come back. And when you refuse to go back, you are you're manhandled with so much impunity. And you're told I'll deal with you and nothing will happen. And that's how they get away with they get away with every single act of impunity that has been method out on ordinary citizens like us. And this answer of protest is just to show how much, um, I would say citizens are unable to continue to endure this level of impunity and brutality, um, against us and, uh, which is obviously an abuse of our rights. And so the, the comments of people in this number is to show that in one voice, we can end this. And we saw the end results from the first few days where the government announced an outright banning of the, of the, uh, the police, that SCA units, their SAS. And since then, little, very little change, very little change. But then we we're gradually going back to what we have always had with them, because they're back on the road with their guns. You don't hear in Nigeria. I don't see the ordinary police man. We say back then, like we usually see over there when we watch movies or when we see the news, we, it's not like, it's not the case here. We, here we are. We are who say over police and with so much impunity,

Leilani Farha  (26:53):

First of all, I just want to say too, um, IB, uh, Tammy and Grace, thank you for telling us your stories because that's, uh, so important for people to hear the actual stories. And I'm always moved. I've heard many, many stories and each one moves me each time. So just a huge, thanks for sharing. I have been incredibly moved and struck by the young people taking to the streets and not just with this SARS situation, but even the work that you're doing to claim space, to claim human rights, to claim your life, to say we are alive, we are making music and art and claiming our rights in every way is so inspiring. It's like, it's completely amazing. And I think you should know that you're off there in Nigeria, but there are those of us out here listening and supporting you and just, you know, wanting you to keep, go, go, go. Because it's so important.

Fredrik Gertten (27:56):

For me, I can see a parallel on what's happening in Chile or in Hong Kong or in Beirut because a lot of people around the world are standing up against corruption and against the, the brutality. And, and, and so, uh, it seems like you are a part of a global movement and for, don't forget about black lives matter because there's a very straight, very obvious, uh, relation to black lives matters. How do you see this Lelani?

Leilani Farha  (28:22):

I really was thinking about those parallels with black lives matter. Um, and the, the relationship between individuals and the state and this brutal violence just it's. And, and as Michael had said, it it's amazing. The impunity actually, I mean, these are not just like small little violations. These are the, the most egregious violations of human rights. People are losing their lives, their livelihoods, their communities, and their homes, and breaking up families and causing an incredibly emotional trauma. These are egregious violations and the impunity is so terrible because we have a system set up an international human rights system that is supposed to help protect.

Chicoco Radio  (29:08):

I mean, we say here, why don't black lives matter in black Africa. Exactly, exactly. And I won't say we were having an editorial meeting one of the days and then Micheal ask. I hope you're following the black life matter. The story in the U S and my response was, I don't see why I should be protesting for an act that took place in the U S whereas what situation is happening here. And we're not protesting that was even before the happened. So it's not like we're not supporting the black lives matter movement up there. But then for, for us here, we're very dominating, trying to speak up because we're afraid that we'll be silenced at this stage with what is happening. It means that we cannot, we cannot be quiet any longer. And our platform is an opportunity for us to keep talking and make our voice heard. The truth of the matter is the trend in the news has always been from those on top. Well, now we're changing the narrative by bringing our testers. And that's how you're hearing more of Nigeria stories. It's amazing. And that is one reason why we participated as volounters in Chicoco, because we want our voice to be head. They always, um, talk news, or they will always read news about us, but you know, when you're here and someone talks about you and you hear about seats, and is this really true because I know this thing did not happen. So they always want to read the news in their way or tell our stories in a way to favor the government and not us, even when they come to bulldoze, even when they come, they will always say, I gave them six months. Notice I gave them one year notice, which they know it's just the lie. And Chicoco came to be a platform for us to like, let them know that our voice needs to be heard. This is our story. We have the right to tell our story. People need to listen to our story the way it happened. I have the firsthand information, not the other way around

Chicoco Radio  (31:05):

That telling of a story is rooted in everyday experience and in data. So there's also a Chicoco maps team that carry out household surveys. We've got the deepest datasets of any part of the city, let alone an informal part of the city, because without that data, you can't make meaningful development plans. And so giving people the power to put themselves on the map, as well as to give voice to their vision of a city that recognizes them and to put themselves in the picture is really what we're trying to do.

Fredrik Gertten (31:45):

It's really inspiring. And, and I think, I think that's also something that is important for me and Leilani, that that inspiration is floating out because the stories we are talking about a lot here is like very harsh stories of evictions, of, of the big hedge funds buying up our cities. It's like, it's, it's so brutal. And it's so rapid. And it's like, so it's affecting people in your town, but also in my town, in Sweden, and also in your town in Canada, the pushback that you are a part of is also, we need to inspire each other. And your inspiration from, from Chicoco is I think, I think something that should be really traveling out to the world, uh, much beyond Africa, because it's, it's, it's, it's very cool what you're doing. Um, we will tell everybody to go and, and check out your website and to follow your work because it's, it's really inspirational.

Chicoco Radio  (32:38):

Chicoc is like that bridge Between the slum dwellers and the government, because I didn't know, most of them don't know what happens here, so chicoco brought the platform, but whereby people can relate their story. Like Micheal rightly said, I am a mapper. And because I have been faced with forceful eviction, getting the story, we go with servey displaced. Most of this waterfront prior to this time were not included in the map of free, vast state. So they asume people do not live there. So when we go to those places are mapped and get service from those places and map them and we'll give those people. We have what we have. We call the encounter and exchange like a stakeholders meeting between the Chicoco and the, and the community. That's the slum dwellers. We give them this to the findings that we'll get from, from their environment that they can now use as a tool, as a source of information, to get things from the government. Because most of those places lack basic infrastructures. Like water like hospitals like schools, when they get this information, they use it to fight for their right of which the government ahve denied them four years, and from every cent Savita with deed, we found that out, we have civil servant, which are supposed to be government workers living in this supposed slums, because the money they get cut even afford a good housing for them for restart. Just recently, the, the minimum wage of Nigeria of an Nigeria worker was raised to 30,000 there, which amounts to about seven, about $47 per month, which is barely enough for anyone to feed yet for people living in the slum. We found out that this pen, it will some of 18 million naira annually just to get thinking water, which is supposed to be part of a basic right to be poor. So it's very expensive to be poor, especially in Rivastigmine Nigeria. We also read in the news about what happens over there, who don't know how terrible the situation is particularly for, um, it was Fredrik will mention this in about, um, uh, inequality or brutality. So do you have, is how terrible is this situation compared to what we have here? Is it,

Chicoco Radio  (35:07):

This is something that pandemic has done, right? Usually it's Africa that is cost is that the dark driver of disease and disorder, and more and more now we're seeing stories of poverty, hunger, homelessness in the rich parts of the world. And it's, it's really perturbing to people. It really turns things on their head. So we're just curious to know what you're, what you're seeing there on your streets.

Fredrik Gertten (35:43):

Yeah. I mean, this is like, Lilana, we've been talking about the UK in the podcast. We were talking about Spain. We're talking about the U S. In the United States. 40 million Americans are one rent away from eviction. So there's a lot, there's a lot of stress. People are, and it's expensive to be poor also in London or in Malmo, Sweden, and in any other country. So it's, it is a global story. Yeah.

Leilani Farha  (36:09):

Yeah. Well, you might like to know, or not, not like to know after the podcast, I will sit at my desk and edit an opinion piece. I'm co-authoring about a community here in Ottawa, Canada, which is one of the richest cities in Canada, a community of a hundred houses is going to be completely demolished to make way for public infrastructure. I'm sure you understand this. Um, it's a new subway line or Metro line. There were six, um, potential ways the line could run four, went around the community. And two went through and the city council went with the w with one of the proposals that goes right through the community. It's a low-income community. So, you know, working people who are working, but not making a lot of money, uh, and racialized. So, I mean, it's happening absolutely everywhere. And I mean, actively, you know, it's not, it's, it's not a passive thing. It's governments taking these decisions around the world to entrenched poverty and make the affluent more affluent. It's some, that's why we keep pushing back. And that's why I draw huge inspiration from you this morning. Now I'm going to sit down and do a good job on this. Op-ed

Fredrik Gertten (37:28):

That's good. That goes now. Laelani is smiling again. When we started this podcast, she was like, grumbling. Oh, I'm so tired. I haven't been sleeping, but now there is a beautiful smile. Beautiful. It's happended to now our audience can't see her, but you can hear your voice. Let's we need some more music, Michael, for coming from radio Chicoco.

Chicoco Radio  (37:28):

 

Fredrik Gertten (42:41):

Wow, thank you very much. Thank you for being here. Taking part of pushback talks, and I, I really hope to come and visit you soon. I really want to go. So Lailani that? It's so good to see your smile back. You know, I know it's, you're working really hard these days.

Leilani Farha  (43:02):

I'm working really hard, but I feel right in this moment, like the luckiest podcaster in the world, I have a great cohost. We have an amazing production team. Thank you, Mikey, Mikey, Mikey. And we were joined by Chicoco FM. I mean, totally cool. It doesn't get better than this. Does it.

Fredrik Gertten (43:21):

Oh, we have a challenge. We have to keep podcasting,

Leilani Farha  (43:25):

I guess so, but we need resources.

Fredrik Gertten (43:28):

We need resources. Yeah. So if you, if you'd like the podcast, you can be a Patron. You go to patreon.com and you actually say, yes, I want to support his podcast with like your monthly $5, $2, $10. You decide and spread the words where right now we have 19 friends out there. And you 19, if you listen, we love you because it's, this is like, it's not a joke. It's actually for real that in some ways we were doing this with a bleeding knees and it, we can't keep doing it forever if we don't get some kind of funding. So, so please help us. And meanwhile also send us ideas on what to, where to go, who to speak to and so on, help us open doors. So thank you. And thank you. Laelani again, I'm, uh, I hope you have a good day. I can soon bike out in the darkness. I mean, it's still some daylight out here, but you know, up here in Sweden, November, it's the darkness comes around four o'clock and somedays. There's a feeling that the day doesn't even start. So get me on a plane to port Hartcourt.

Fredrik Gertten (44:45):

Anyway, thank you for.